Remake of the Coastal Integrated Forestry Operations Approvals - Consultation Closed

Image of State Forest in NSW

The NSW Government is updating the rules for native timber harvesting in NSW’s coastal forests. These rules, called the Integrated Forestry Operations Approvals (IFOA) set the rules for how forestry operations can be carried out on State forests and Crown timber lands in NSW.

IFOAs effectively set out rules to protect native plants, animals, important habitat and ecosystems, soils and water in native forestry operations on public land. They also set requirements to achieve ecologically sustainable forest management in NSW.

Over 3 million people visit NSW’s coastal forests each year for a range of activities. Native forests provide valuable habitat for threatened plants and animals. They are also an important resource for materials in everyday life like hardwood timber for high-end construction, furniture, fences and floors.


The Draft Coastal IFOA

The Draft Coastal IFOA is made up of two separate documents: Draft Coastal IFOA Conditions and Draft Coastal IFOA Protocols.

Once approved, this single Coastal IFOA will replace the four existing IFOAs for coastal NSW Together the new IFOA will provide clarity, transparency and enforceability as well as better balancing environmental outcomes and timber production. It will also reduce compliance and implementation costs, making it easier for industry to comply and for the EPA to regulate activities.

Download a copy of the draft Coastal IFOA


How can I have my say

The Draft Coastal IFOA was open for public consultation from 15 May 2018 to 13 July 2018. Comments on the draft have now closed.

The NSW Government received approximately 3000 submissions. The Government will now take time to consider these public comments as it works to finalise the new Coastal IFOA.

Each submission will be treated as a confidential document unless the author requested it to be made public.

The NSW Government is updating the rules for native timber harvesting in NSW’s coastal forests. These rules, called the Integrated Forestry Operations Approvals (IFOA) set the rules for how forestry operations can be carried out on State forests and Crown timber lands in NSW.

IFOAs effectively set out rules to protect native plants, animals, important habitat and ecosystems, soils and water in native forestry operations on public land. They also set requirements to achieve ecologically sustainable forest management in NSW.

Over 3 million people visit NSW’s coastal forests each year for a range of activities. Native forests provide valuable habitat for threatened plants and animals. They are also an important resource for materials in everyday life like hardwood timber for high-end construction, furniture, fences and floors.


The Draft Coastal IFOA

The Draft Coastal IFOA is made up of two separate documents: Draft Coastal IFOA Conditions and Draft Coastal IFOA Protocols.

Once approved, this single Coastal IFOA will replace the four existing IFOAs for coastal NSW Together the new IFOA will provide clarity, transparency and enforceability as well as better balancing environmental outcomes and timber production. It will also reduce compliance and implementation costs, making it easier for industry to comply and for the EPA to regulate activities.

Download a copy of the draft Coastal IFOA


How can I have my say

The Draft Coastal IFOA was open for public consultation from 15 May 2018 to 13 July 2018. Comments on the draft have now closed.

The NSW Government received approximately 3000 submissions. The Government will now take time to consider these public comments as it works to finalise the new Coastal IFOA.

Each submission will be treated as a confidential document unless the author requested it to be made public.

Category logging   Show all

  • What is the NSW Governments current total wood supply commitment in North East NSW, and what is included in this calculation?

    3 months ago
    CLOSED: Consultation on the Draft Coastal IFOA has concluded.

    The NSW Government updated its model for long-term sustainability of timber supply on the North East NSW (both Upper and Lower North East Regions) between 2012 and 2016 and summary of this work is available here(External link).

    The North East Long-term Wood Supply Model(External link) (see p48, NRC Report 2016) combines all High Quality Logs including; large sawlogs (those with a centre diameter under bark > 40 cm), small sawlogs (cdub <40cm) , veneer logs, poles, girders and piles. This model includes hardwood timber volumes available from both the plantation and native forest areas. The modelled high quality volume...

    The NSW Government updated its model for long-term sustainability of timber supply on the North East NSW (both Upper and Lower North East Regions) between 2012 and 2016 and summary of this work is available here(External link).

    The North East Long-term Wood Supply Model(External link) (see p48, NRC Report 2016) combines all High Quality Logs including; large sawlogs (those with a centre diameter under bark > 40 cm), small sawlogs (cdub <40cm) , veneer logs, poles, girders and piles. This model includes hardwood timber volumes available from both the plantation and native forest areas. The modelled high quality volume averages around 237,000m3 per annum. The model shows the proportion of high quality timber available from plantations increases over time, reaching as high as 25% of the total high quality volume in some later periods.

    The first increase in supply from plantations occurs as a result of volumes becoming available from the plantations established with funding provided under the RFA beginning to mature and reach commercial size from around 2025. The second increase is modelled to occur around 2050 from plantings where older flooded gum plantations, originally established in the 1960s and 1970s are being harvested and replanted with high value commercial species such as blackbutt.

    The increase in the proportion of timber sourced from plantations leads to a projected increase in proportions of smaller sized sawlogs in later periods of the model. Over the next 20 years the model predicts 30% of the high quality logs are small whilst the average is around 45% over the full hundred years and reaching close to 50% in some periods.

    This model informs wood supply allocation agreements made by the Forestry Corporation with timber processors. Timber is supplied under a range of commercial contracts, called Wood Supply Agreements with individual timber customers. Current commitments for high quality timber under wood supply agreements for the North East are shown in Table 1.

    Table 1. Wood Supply Allocations from State Forests in North East NSW – 2018.

    High Quality Product Allocation

    Base Wood Supply Agreement Allocation

    (m3/annum)

    Large Sawlogs (>40 cm)

    127,145

    Small Sawlogs (<40 cm)

    46,096

    Poles

    31,600

    Veneer

    11,202

    Girders

    4,150

    Piles

    260

    Total

    220,423

    Other volumes sold under a range of supply agreements

    High Quality Log Volume sold under parcel sales – note these are included in the sustained yield model

    ~10,000

    Annual Salvage log, pulpwood and residue sales

    ~average 300,000

    These agreements typically include clauses around indicative area of supply, species mix, annual variation to deal with annual supply fluctuations associated with weather and other logistical issues. This means annual supply can vary but the base allocation represents the long-term average yields that can be provided under those agreements.

    Lower Quality Log Agreements

    Whilst sustainability modelling is based around high quality log product volumes, there are also significant volumes of lower grade sawlogs, pulpwood and residue products sold each year that arise during harvesting operations primarily conducted to produce high quality products. Low quality logs are sold to customers under a range of supply agreements with different lengths and levels of requirements for supply. The total annual volume sold tends to be more variable than high quality products but typically represents 50-60% of annual log sales.

    This article was prepared by the Natural Resource Commission, The Department of Primary Industries and Forest Corporation NSW.