Protecting the Snowies

While the initial stage of consultation on developing a wild horse management plan for Kosciuszko National Park is now closed, the materials and conversation remain online for you to review. Extensive community and stakeholder engagement, advice from the Independent Technical Reference Group, assessment of the heritage and social significance of wild horses in the park, and review of past wild horse management programs all helped shape the draft plan which is currently on public exhibition until 19 August 2016. To have your say on the draft plan go to Kosciuszko National Park Draft Wild Horse Management Plan – public consultation.

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While the initial stage of consultation on developing a wild horse management plan for Kosciuszko National Park is now closed, the materials and conversation remain online for you to review. Extensive community and stakeholder engagement, advice from the Independent Technical Reference Group, assessment of the heritage and social significance of wild horses in the park, and review of past wild horse management programs all helped shape the draft plan which is currently on public exhibition until 19 August 2016. To have your say on the draft plan go to Kosciuszko National Park Draft Wild Horse Management Plan – public consultation.

Join the conversation
Share your story
Host a kitchen table discussion
Explore the history
Take the survey
Download info sheets
Ask a question
View videos from 21c Town Hall Meeting
Discussions: All (33) Open (1)
  • Over the course of the consultation we have heard from a wide range of people on the management of wild horses in the Snowy Mountains including rangers, ecologist, people rehoming brumbies, the RSPCA, local helicopter pilot, documentary maker, a bushwalker, mountain horsemen and women, to acknowledge a few. In this our final forum for the online consultation we ask: Who do you most identify or agree with when it comes to the protection of the park and wild horse management?Watch the full 34 videos on the Protecting the Snowies playlist.
    Over the course of the consultation we have heard from a wide range of people on the management of wild horses in the Snowy Mountains including rangers, ecologist, people rehoming brumbies, the RSPCA, local helicopter pilot, documentary maker, a bushwalker, mountain horsemen and women, to acknowledge a few. In this our final forum for the online consultation we ask: Who do you most identify or agree with when it comes to the protection of the park and wild horse management?Watch the full 34 videos on the Protecting the Snowies playlist.
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    .  The safety of NPWS staff and others involved in the activity

    .  The cost of the undertaking the control method

    .  How humane the control method is

    .  The effectiveness of the method to control population numbers


    .  The safety of NPWS staff and others involved in the activity

    .  The cost of the undertaking the control method

    .  How humane the control method is

    .  The effectiveness of the method to control population numbers


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  • Why do we need to have National Parks?

    by Catherine Russell, over 2 years ago
    Thank you for your contribution to this discussion. This discussion is now closed but you can still view the material and the discussion.

    In your own words what is the purpose of a National Park? And do we need them today? 


    In your own words what is the purpose of a National Park? And do we need them today? 


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  • Thank you for your contribution to this discussion. This discussion is now closed but you can still view the material and the discussion.

    Over the past five months a number of additional things have been put forward for NPWS to consider as part of the review of the plan. Do you have any additional things you would like to see reflected or addressed in the new plan? 


    Over the past five months a number of additional things have been put forward for NPWS to consider as part of the review of the plan. Do you have any additional things you would like to see reflected or addressed in the new plan? 


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  • Thank you for your contribution to this discussion. This discussion is now closed but you can still view the material and the discussion.

    Where do you sit on a sliding scale from 0 to 10, with 0 being (this control method) is completely UNACCEPTABLE for wild horses in KNP and 10 being (this control method) is completely ACCEPTABLE for wild horses in KNP? 

    Methods that could be considered to manage the wild horse population include: 

    • Trapping and removal then rehoming or transport to abattoir
    • Trapping and euthanasia at trap site where horses can’t be rehomed or transported
    • Aerial or ground mustering
    • Fertility control
    • Ground shooting
    • Brumby running or roping
    • Fencing
    • Aerial shooting
    • Do... Continue reading

    Where do you sit on a sliding scale from 0 to 10, with 0 being (this control method) is completely UNACCEPTABLE for wild horses in KNP and 10 being (this control method) is completely ACCEPTABLE for wild horses in KNP? 

    Methods that could be considered to manage the wild horse population include: 

    • Trapping and removal then rehoming or transport to abattoir
    • Trapping and euthanasia at trap site where horses can’t be rehomed or transported
    • Aerial or ground mustering
    • Fertility control
    • Ground shooting
    • Brumby running or roping
    • Fencing
    • Aerial shooting
    • Do nothing option 


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  • Thank you for your contribution to this discussion. This discussion is now closed but you can still view the material and the discussion.

    Wild horse management is a complex and sensitive issue. When you talk about it in your community what is the one thing you want people to understand? 


    Wild horse management is a complex and sensitive issue. When you talk about it in your community what is the one thing you want people to understand? 


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  • Thank you for your contribution to this discussion. This discussion is now closed but you can still view the material and the discussion.
    Wild horse management in National Parks attracts a broad spectrum of views. Here are four perspectives – what resonates with you? What stands out? What challenges your views? 

    Listen to Leisa Caldwell, Madison from the Hunter Valley Brumby Association, David Chief Inspector of NSW RSPCA, Mick from NPWS, Rob from the Nature Conservation Council of NSW. 

    This series of video presentations were made at the November 21st Century Townhall, an innovative consultation approach that draws together 150 people including stakeholders and the general public to examine the Wild Horse Management Plan and to... Continue reading

    Wild horse management in National Parks attracts a broad spectrum of views. Here are four perspectives – what resonates with you? What stands out? What challenges your views? 

    Listen to Leisa Caldwell, Madison from the Hunter Valley Brumby Association, David Chief Inspector of NSW RSPCA, Mick from NPWS, Rob from the Nature Conservation Council of NSW. 

    This series of video presentations were made at the November 21st Century Townhall, an innovative consultation approach that draws together 150 people including stakeholders and the general public to examine the Wild Horse Management Plan and to provide input that will help redraft the approach to wild horse management Kosciusko National Park.

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  • Thank you for your contribution to this discussion. This discussion is now closed but you can still view the material and the discussion.

    This inforgraphic outlines how the wild horse population has grown and spread throughout Kosciusko National Park in the past ten years, seeing wild horses entering areas of the park where previously they had never inhabited.  

    Are there locations that should be kept free of wild horses, where are these places and why should we keep them free of wild horses? 

    THIS TOPIC WILL REMAIN OPEN TILL 12 DECEMBER


    This inforgraphic outlines how the wild horse population has grown and spread throughout Kosciusko National Park in the past ten years, seeing wild horses entering areas of the park where previously they had never inhabited.  

    Are there locations that should be kept free of wild horses, where are these places and why should we keep them free of wild horses? 

    THIS TOPIC WILL REMAIN OPEN TILL 12 DECEMBER


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  • Thank you for your contribution to this discussion. This discussion is now closed but you can still view the material and the discussion.

    Should we stop all attempts to control the wild horse population? And if we do opt to do nothing, what could happen? 

    THIS TOPIC WILL REMAIN OPEN TILL 12 DECEMBER




    Should we stop all attempts to control the wild horse population? And if we do opt to do nothing, what could happen? 

    THIS TOPIC WILL REMAIN OPEN TILL 12 DECEMBER




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  • Thank you for your contribution to this discussion. This discussion is now closed but you can still view the material and the discussion.

    A historical approach to controlling wild horses in the Snowy Mountains was roping and brumby running – where by wild horses are pursued on horseback and caught via roping. The practice is currently illegal in NSW national parks as it is was regarded to be high risk to both horses and riders and inhumane.What are your views about Is this as a legitimate control method?

    THIS TOPIC WILL REMAIN OPEN TILL 12 DECEMBER 




    A historical approach to controlling wild horses in the Snowy Mountains was roping and brumby running – where by wild horses are pursued on horseback and caught via roping. The practice is currently illegal in NSW national parks as it is was regarded to be high risk to both horses and riders and inhumane.What are your views about Is this as a legitimate control method?

    THIS TOPIC WILL REMAIN OPEN TILL 12 DECEMBER 




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  • Thank you for your contribution to this discussion. This discussion is now closed but you can still view the material and the discussion.

    A topic of some discussion, several participants have asked for this forum to be reopened. 

    Fencing is one mitigation proposed in the current wild horse management plan (see page 18). How effective do you think this could be? And where should we look to place fencing in the National Park? 

    THIS DISCUSSION HAS BEEN REOPENED AND WILL STAY OPEN TILL 12 DECEMBER.  



    A topic of some discussion, several participants have asked for this forum to be reopened. 

    Fencing is one mitigation proposed in the current wild horse management plan (see page 18). How effective do you think this could be? And where should we look to place fencing in the National Park? 

    THIS DISCUSSION HAS BEEN REOPENED AND WILL STAY OPEN TILL 12 DECEMBER.  



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  • Thank you for your contribution to this discussion. This discussion is now closed but you can still view the material and the discussion.
    Q22

    We hope you have been enjoying the opportunity to participate in discussions related to the management of wild horses in Kosciuszko National Park. It has been great to hear from so many people. Do you have a topic you would like to discuss? Nominate your topic below or vote for a topic you would like to discuss. We will continue to open topics for discussion until 30 November and these topics will remain open for at least 10 days. We thank you for your contributions to the conversation. 

    We hope you have been enjoying the opportunity to participate in discussions related to the management of wild horses in Kosciuszko National Park. It has been great to hear from so many people. Do you have a topic you would like to discuss? Nominate your topic below or vote for a topic you would like to discuss. We will continue to open topics for discussion until 30 November and these topics will remain open for at least 10 days. We thank you for your contributions to the conversation. 

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    New p12

    A topic of some discussion, several participants have asked for this forum to be reopened. 

    Since 2002 only 2600 wild horses have been removed from the National Park at a total cost of more than $2.8 million. 

    These costs include planning, ongoing engagement with the community, and the purchase of equipment like vehicles and yards as well as ongoing operation costs.

    THIS DISCUSSION HAS BEEN REOPENED AND WILL STAY OPEN TILL 12 DECEMBER.  

    While every effort is made to work with rehoming organisations - not all wild horses removed from the National Park find a new home. 

    The passive removal of wild horses from the National Park is the only management method undertaken by NSW NPWS.



    A topic of some discussion, several participants have asked for this forum to be reopened. 

    Since 2002 only 2600 wild horses have been removed from the National Park at a total cost of more than $2.8 million. 

    These costs include planning, ongoing engagement with the community, and the purchase of equipment like vehicles and yards as well as ongoing operation costs.

    THIS DISCUSSION HAS BEEN REOPENED AND WILL STAY OPEN TILL 12 DECEMBER.  

    While every effort is made to work with rehoming organisations - not all wild horses removed from the National Park find a new home. 

    The passive removal of wild horses from the National Park is the only management method undertaken by NSW NPWS.



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  • Thank you for your contribution to this discussion. This discussion is now closed but you can still view the material and the discussion.
    Q26

    Despite the best efforts of NPWS and rehoming groups like the Victorian Brumby Association, Hunter Valley Brumby Association and Brumbies R Us that have assisted with the rehoming program, only about 30-40% of the wild horses each year find a new home outside of the National Park. Can you suggest ways that the rehoming rate can be improved? 

    THIS DISCUSSION OPENED ON 11 NOVEMBER AND WILL BE OPEN TILL 12 DECEMBER.

    Information and registration details on how you can receive horses from the trapping and removal program can be found here. Have you registered your interest?... Continue reading

    Despite the best efforts of NPWS and rehoming groups like the Victorian Brumby Association, Hunter Valley Brumby Association and Brumbies R Us that have assisted with the rehoming program, only about 30-40% of the wild horses each year find a new home outside of the National Park. Can you suggest ways that the rehoming rate can be improved? 

    THIS DISCUSSION OPENED ON 11 NOVEMBER AND WILL BE OPEN TILL 12 DECEMBER.

    Information and registration details on how you can receive horses from the trapping and removal program can be found here. Have you registered your interest?
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  • Thank you for your contribution to this discussion. This discussion is now closed but you can still view the material and the discussion.

    Join the conversation

    Did you know the Snowy Mountains attract more than 2 million visitors every year? Are you one of them and what brings you to the National Park? 

    Richard grew up in the city but has been captivated by the Snowy Mountains.

    He shares his story on the people he has met, the landscape he has seen and why the Snowy Mountains are a special place for all Australians.

    THIS DISCUSSION IS NOW CLOSED. IT WAS OPEN FOR MORE THAN 40 DAYS. 


    Join the conversation

    Did you know the Snowy Mountains attract more than 2 million visitors every year? Are you one of them and what brings you to the National Park? 

    Richard grew up in the city but has been captivated by the Snowy Mountains.

    He shares his story on the people he has met, the landscape he has seen and why the Snowy Mountains are a special place for all Australians.

    THIS DISCUSSION IS NOW CLOSED. IT WAS OPEN FOR MORE THAN 40 DAYS. 


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  • Thank you for your contribution to this discussion. This discussion is now closed but you can still view the material and the discussion.
    Img 0133

    There are lots of ways to get involved and contribute to the review and redrafting of the Wild Horse Management Plan. 

    Now you can download or complete online the Kitchen Table Discussion Guide – its a way to have a guided conversation about the Wild Horse Management Plan at home, in your office, in your community group or classroom and then provide this feedback to the review process. 

    There is also the online survey, an opportunity to share your stories and pictures as well as the ongoing conversation via the online forums here.

    All this input will be... Continue reading

    There are lots of ways to get involved and contribute to the review and redrafting of the Wild Horse Management Plan. 

    Now you can download or complete online the Kitchen Table Discussion Guide – its a way to have a guided conversation about the Wild Horse Management Plan at home, in your office, in your community group or classroom and then provide this feedback to the review process. 

    There is also the online survey, an opportunity to share your stories and pictures as well as the ongoing conversation via the online forums here.

    All this input will be collated and help inform the review and redraft of the Wild Horse Management Plan which will then be placed on public exhibition for further consultation mid next year (2015).

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  • Thank you for your contribution to this discussion. You can still view the material and the discussion. While this discussion is closed, new discussions will continue to open until 12 December 2014.

    Join the conversation

    Have you given a wild horse a new home? 

    Alex is passionate about wild horses and finding them a new home outside the National Park.

    Alex receives wild horses from the National Parks removal program, the only wild horse population control practice in the Snowy Mountains.

    The wild horses, where possible, are then rehomed in the region and throughout New South Wales.

    THIS DISCUSSION IS NOW CLOSED. IT WAS OPEN FOR MORE THAN 40 DAYS. 


    Join the conversation

    Have you given a wild horse a new home? 

    Alex is passionate about wild horses and finding them a new home outside the National Park.

    Alex receives wild horses from the National Parks removal program, the only wild horse population control practice in the Snowy Mountains.

    The wild horses, where possible, are then rehomed in the region and throughout New South Wales.

    THIS DISCUSSION IS NOW CLOSED. IT WAS OPEN FOR MORE THAN 40 DAYS. 


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  • Do we need a wild horse sanctuary?

    by Catherine Russell, almost 3 years ago
    Thank you for your contribution to this discussion. You can still view the material and the discussion. While this discussion is closed, new discussions will continue to open until 12 December 2014.

     The idea of a wild horse sanctuary has been proposed throughout this review of the Wild Horse Management Plan. To explore this further, could a wild horse sanctuary exist in the National Park? How could it be funded and operated? What benefits and considerations might a sanctuary present for the management of wild horses?

    THIS TOPIC WAS OPEN FOR 14 DAYS CLOSING ON THE 13 NOVEMBER 



     The idea of a wild horse sanctuary has been proposed throughout this review of the Wild Horse Management Plan. To explore this further, could a wild horse sanctuary exist in the National Park? How could it be funded and operated? What benefits and considerations might a sanctuary present for the management of wild horses?

    THIS TOPIC WAS OPEN FOR 14 DAYS CLOSING ON THE 13 NOVEMBER 



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  • Thank you for your contribution to this discussion. You can still view the material and the discussion. While this discussion is closed, new discussions will continue to open until 30 November 2014.

    The current Wild Horse Management Plan for Kosciuszko National Park has been in place since 2008. 

    Should the existing objectives stay in place? Should there be new ones? Tom Bagnat from NPWS outlines the purposes of the plan and activities currently in place. 

    THIS DISCUSSION WAS OPEN FOR 14 DAYS AND CLOSED ON 28 SEPTEMBER.


    The objectives of the existing plan are detailed on page 3 and page 30 of the plan and are detailed as follows:

    • to exclude horses from 
    • the Main Range Management Unit; 
    • the Yarrangobilly Management Unit; 
    • the Cooleman Plain Management Unit; 
    • ... Continue reading

    The current Wild Horse Management Plan for Kosciuszko National Park has been in place since 2008. 

    Should the existing objectives stay in place? Should there be new ones? Tom Bagnat from NPWS outlines the purposes of the plan and activities currently in place. 

    THIS DISCUSSION WAS OPEN FOR 14 DAYS AND CLOSED ON 28 SEPTEMBER.


    The objectives of the existing plan are detailed on page 3 and page 30 of the plan and are detailed as follows:

    • to exclude horses from 
    • the Main Range Management Unit; 
    • the Yarrangobilly Management Unit; 
    • the Cooleman Plain Management Unit; 
    • safety risk areas such as highways; 
    • areas of the park where horses have not been or have only recently been 
    • recorded (e.g. Jagungal); 
    • areas of the park adjoining other Australian Alps national parks and 
    • reserves; and 
    • feeder areas for all of these parts of the park.  
    • to reduce horse numbers in other specific areas to reduce the risk they pose. 
    These areas would be where horses have an impact on public safety, the 
    environment or on the cultural heritage of the Park 

    • to make sure that all horses are treated humanely throughout the removal process 
    and their removal complies with current Codes of Practice

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  • Thank you for your contribution to this discussion. You can still view the material and the discussion. While this discussion is closed, new discussions will continue to open until 12 December 2014.

    We were recently approached by a student from Jindabyne Central School about her intention to do her forthcoming speech for the 2014 Rostrum public speaking competition on the issue of wild horse management in Kosciuszko National Park. As Molly states in her speech, it is a topic generating significant interest in her local area. 

    THIS FORUM OPENED ON 22 OCTOBER AND CLOSED ON 7 NOVEMBER 


    She was encouraged by NPWS staff to seek all sides of the story and was assisted with contacts for a range of people, including brumby advocate groups, to seek opinions and viewpoints.... Continue reading

    We were recently approached by a student from Jindabyne Central School about her intention to do her forthcoming speech for the 2014 Rostrum public speaking competition on the issue of wild horse management in Kosciuszko National Park. As Molly states in her speech, it is a topic generating significant interest in her local area. 

    THIS FORUM OPENED ON 22 OCTOBER AND CLOSED ON 7 NOVEMBER 


    She was encouraged by NPWS staff to seek all sides of the story and was assisted with contacts for a range of people, including brumby advocate groups, to seek opinions and viewpoints. Molly delves into some of the opposing views of the issue and leaves us with the question of what legacy we, every one of us, will leave for future generations as a result of our attitudes towards wild horse management. 

    As required by Rostrum, Molly wrote the speech herself using the material she had collected. It was posted on Youtube and the Rostrum website.

    NPWS sought permission from the student and her parents to use it as it provides yet another perspective on the issue, this time from a 12 year old resident of the district.

    We remind all visitors to be aware of the Forum Etiquette and Moderation guidelines, which can be found at https://engage.environment.nsw.gov.au/moderation


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  • What does humane treatment mean to you?

    by Catherine Russell, almost 3 years ago
    Thank you for your contribution to this discussion. You can still view the material and the discussion. While this discussion is closed, new discussions will continue to open until 30 November 2014.

    Animal welfare and humane treatment is a key consideration in any method of control for introduced animals like wild horses. The RSPCA are involved in the control program to ensure control and removal processes complies with animal welfare Codes of Practice. (See Page 29 section 9.3 Monitoring of humaneness in the Wild Horse Management Plan).

    Here the RSPCA outlines how humane treatment applies to the practices within the Wild Horse Management Plan. 

    THIS FORUM OPENED ON 13 OCTOBER AND CLOSED ON 27 OCTOBER 



    Animal welfare and humane treatment is a key consideration in any method of control for introduced animals like wild horses. The RSPCA are involved in the control program to ensure control and removal processes complies with animal welfare Codes of Practice. (See Page 29 section 9.3 Monitoring of humaneness in the Wild Horse Management Plan).

    Here the RSPCA outlines how humane treatment applies to the practices within the Wild Horse Management Plan. 

    THIS FORUM OPENED ON 13 OCTOBER AND CLOSED ON 27 OCTOBER 



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  • What do wild horses mean to you?

    by Catherine Russell, almost 3 years ago
    Thank you for your contribution to this discussion. You can still view the material and the discussion. While this discussion is closed, new discussions will continue to open until 30 November 2014.

    This topic was suggested by HVBA Vice President through our open forum calling for topics of interest.  

    When only a few hundred wild horses roamed the mountains they were immortalised by Banjo Paterson in 'The Man from Snowy River'. Today the wild horses mean different things to different people. 

    What do they mean to you? With thanks to the Guardian Australia, Peter Cochran shares what the wild horses mean to him and the men and women of the high country. 

    THIS DISCUSSION WAS OPEN FOR 14 DAYS AND CLOSED ON 28 SEPTEMBER.

    This topic was suggested by HVBA Vice President through our open forum calling for topics of interest.  

    When only a few hundred wild horses roamed the mountains they were immortalised by Banjo Paterson in 'The Man from Snowy River'. Today the wild horses mean different things to different people. 

    What do they mean to you? With thanks to the Guardian Australia, Peter Cochran shares what the wild horses mean to him and the men and women of the high country. 

    THIS DISCUSSION WAS OPEN FOR 14 DAYS AND CLOSED ON 28 SEPTEMBER.

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  • Thank you for your contribution to this discussion. You can still view the material and the discussion. While this discussion is closed, new discussions will continue to open until 30 November 2014.
    Q14

    It was proposed in the existing plan that NPWS establish partnerships with Universities and interest groups to do long term monitoring of erosion, population, habitat, grazing trails, weed transmission and the impacts on threatened species (see page 28). Could we do this? Could we look to local people and regular visitors to the park to provide images or log information about key locations using an smart phone application? What ideas could help monitor or measure the impacts?

    THIS FORUM WILL BE OPEN FOR 14 DAYS CLOSING ON 13 OCTOBER. 


    It was proposed in the existing plan that NPWS establish partnerships with Universities and interest groups to do long term monitoring of erosion, population, habitat, grazing trails, weed transmission and the impacts on threatened species (see page 28). Could we do this? Could we look to local people and regular visitors to the park to provide images or log information about key locations using an smart phone application? What ideas could help monitor or measure the impacts?

    THIS FORUM WILL BE OPEN FOR 14 DAYS CLOSING ON 13 OCTOBER. 


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  • The response to this forum has been significant in a short period. Some valuable points have been made however to keep the online consultation credible, effective and respectful this forum has been closed early.
    P13

    This article appeared on The Conversation and has been shared widely through the media in the following 24 hours. The reaction to the article includes a follow up piece with the academics and Peter Cochran in the  Sydney Morning Herald.  

    As an article that is widely public and one that is related to the management of wild horses in the National Park – what do you think about it? 

    Note that NPWS does not endorse or defend the The Conversation article but presents it as a perspective in the discussion about the management of... Continue reading

    This article appeared on The Conversation and has been shared widely through the media in the following 24 hours. The reaction to the article includes a follow up piece with the academics and Peter Cochran in the  Sydney Morning Herald.  

    As an article that is widely public and one that is related to the management of wild horses in the National Park – what do you think about it? 

    Note that NPWS does not endorse or defend the The Conversation article but presents it as a perspective in the discussion about the management of wild horses in the National Park.

    Don Driscoll and Sam Banks from the Australian National University share their recent experience in the Snowy Mountains. 

    They write: When you think of horses in the Australian high country, you might imagine noble brumbies galloping out from snowgums across grassy peaks, tails and manes trailing like streamers. But on a recent trip to the Snowy Mountains in Kosciuszko National Park we made a grim discovery about these denizens of the Australian psyche.

    THIS FORUM WAS CLOSED EARLY DUE TO SIGNIFICANT RESPONSES IN A SHORT PERIOD. 


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    A summary of the 2014 aerial survey results as they relate to Kosciuszko National Park is now available. 

    NPWS draws together a range of evidence and seeks independent advice from animal welfare experts, wildlife ecologists, animal behavioural scientists and experienced horse handlers to develop and review the wild horse management plan. Dr Michelle Dawson, using scientific methods applied to species throughout the world, has studied the wild horses in the Snowy Mountains for over ten years.

    A summary of the 2014 aerial survey results as they relate to Kosciuszko National Park is now available. 

    NPWS draws together a range of evidence and seeks independent advice from animal welfare experts, wildlife ecologists, animal behavioural scientists and experienced horse handlers to develop and review the wild horse management plan. Dr Michelle Dawson, using scientific methods applied to species throughout the world, has studied the wild horses in the Snowy Mountains for over ten years.

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    Chris Hayward is an adventurer who this year undertook an expedition from Sea to Source to Summit - starting at the mouth of the Murray River and paddling upstream to Hume (Weir), where he left his kayak and then continued on foot through to the Corryong and Khancoban following the upper Murray and Indi Rivers to its Source at Cowombat Flat, then followed the Australian Alps Walking Track to the summit of Mt Kosciuszko. 

    He talks here about seeing wild horses and their impacts on the National Park.


     

    Chris Hayward is an adventurer who this year undertook an expedition from Sea to Source to Summit - starting at the mouth of the Murray River and paddling upstream to Hume (Weir), where he left his kayak and then continued on foot through to the Corryong and Khancoban following the upper Murray and Indi Rivers to its Source at Cowombat Flat, then followed the Australian Alps Walking Track to the summit of Mt Kosciuszko. 

    He talks here about seeing wild horses and their impacts on the National Park.


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    National Parks Ranger Rob Gibbs steps us through the impacts of wild horses on the habitat of the broad-toothed rat. What do you think about the impact of wild horses? 

    National Parks Ranger Rob Gibbs steps us through the impacts of wild horses on the habitat of the broad-toothed rat. What do you think about the impact of wild horses? 

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    New p7

    Gabrielle Chan from The Guardian takes a comprehensive look at management of wild horses in Australia's high country. The battle over Australia's brumbies 

    She starts: It’s been a hard winter for Australia’s wild horses. But things may be about to get much worse for these totemic animals. Their swelling numbers are damaging the continent’s precious alpine ranges ...

    THIS DISCUSSION WAS OPEN FOR 14 DAYS AND CLOSED ON THE 4 SEPTEMBER. 



    Gabrielle Chan from The Guardian takes a comprehensive look at management of wild horses in Australia's high country. The battle over Australia's brumbies 

    She starts: It’s been a hard winter for Australia’s wild horses. But things may be about to get much worse for these totemic animals. Their swelling numbers are damaging the continent’s precious alpine ranges ...

    THIS DISCUSSION WAS OPEN FOR 14 DAYS AND CLOSED ON THE 4 SEPTEMBER. 



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    Horses 04

    The online survey provides another way for interested people to have their say including the opportunity to rank the management approaches as to their effectiveness and humane treatment (Question 22 & 23). 

    Take the Survey or join the conversation about the effectiveness and human treatment of the different management approaches outlined in the Wild Horse Management Plan which include: 

    - Fertility control 

    - Trapping and euthanasia

    - Trapping and relocation (outside the National Park)

    - Baiting and Poisioning 

    - Fencing 

    - Ground shooting 

    - Aerial shooting 


    The online survey provides another way for interested people to have their say including the opportunity to rank the management approaches as to their effectiveness and humane treatment (Question 22 & 23). 

    Take the Survey or join the conversation about the effectiveness and human treatment of the different management approaches outlined in the Wild Horse Management Plan which include: 

    - Fertility control 

    - Trapping and euthanasia

    - Trapping and relocation (outside the National Park)

    - Baiting and Poisioning 

    - Fencing 

    - Ground shooting 

    - Aerial shooting 


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    Join the conversation

    THIS DISCUSSION MAY OPEN AGAIN BEFORE 30 NOVEMBER. 

    The only management approach to wild horses in the National Park is to remove them and where possible rehome them with the help of organisations like BrumbiesRUS.

    Local and experienced horse handlers work with NPWS to remove wild horses from the National Park. Here Matt steps through the process of physically removing wild horses from the National Parks. 


    Join the conversation

    THIS DISCUSSION MAY OPEN AGAIN BEFORE 30 NOVEMBER. 

    The only management approach to wild horses in the National Park is to remove them and where possible rehome them with the help of organisations like BrumbiesRUS.

    Local and experienced horse handlers work with NPWS to remove wild horses from the National Park. Here Matt steps through the process of physically removing wild horses from the National Parks. 


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    Join the conversation

    THIS DISCUSSION MAY OPEN AGAIN BEFORE 30 NOVEMBER. 

    Colin de Pagter flys the Snowy Mountains and the Australian Alps everyday - for tourism, for bushfires, for search and rescue, for aerial survey work - his eyes have seen the landscape over the past ten years and he shares his story about the environment and the wild horses.


    Join the conversation

    THIS DISCUSSION MAY OPEN AGAIN BEFORE 30 NOVEMBER. 

    Colin de Pagter flys the Snowy Mountains and the Australian Alps everyday - for tourism, for bushfires, for search and rescue, for aerial survey work - his eyes have seen the landscape over the past ten years and he shares his story about the environment and the wild horses.


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    Join the conversation

    Dr Linda Broome, a wildlife ecologist, shares her point of view why managing threats and impacts to our National Parks is so important.

    National Parks are public assets that are protected under legislation. The Snowy Mountains are home to animals and plants that occur nowhere else on earth.



    Join the conversation

    Dr Linda Broome, a wildlife ecologist, shares her point of view why managing threats and impacts to our National Parks is so important.

    National Parks are public assets that are protected under legislation. The Snowy Mountains are home to animals and plants that occur nowhere else on earth.



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    Join the conversation

    THIS DISCUSSION MAY OPEN AGAIN BEFORE 30 NOVEMBER. 

    Chris Hayward is an adventurer who this year undertook an expedition from Sea to Source to Summit - starting at the mouth of the Murray River and paddling upstream to Hume (Weir), where he left his kayak and then continued on foot through to the Corryong and Khancoban following the upper Murray and Indi Rivers to its Source at Cowombat Flat, then followed the  Australian Alps Walking Track  to the summit of Mt Kosciuszko.

    He talks here about seeing wild horses and their impacts on the National Park. 

    ... Continue reading

    Join the conversation

    THIS DISCUSSION MAY OPEN AGAIN BEFORE 30 NOVEMBER. 

    Chris Hayward is an adventurer who this year undertook an expedition from Sea to Source to Summit - starting at the mouth of the Murray River and paddling upstream to Hume (Weir), where he left his kayak and then continued on foot through to the Corryong and Khancoban following the upper Murray and Indi Rivers to its Source at Cowombat Flat, then followed the  Australian Alps Walking Track  to the summit of Mt Kosciuszko.

    He talks here about seeing wild horses and their impacts on the National Park. 




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