Have you completed the survey? Have you ranked the wild horse management approaches?

by Catherine Russell, about 3 years ago
Thank you for your contribution to this discussion. You can still view the material and the discussion. While this discussion is closed, new discussions will continue to open until 12 December 2014.

The online survey provides another way for interested people to have their say including the opportunity to rank the management approaches as to their effectiveness and humane treatment (Question 22 & 23). 

Take the Survey or join the conversation about the effectiveness and human treatment of the different management approaches outlined in the Wild Horse Management Plan which include: 

- Fertility control 

- Trapping and euthanasia

- Trapping and relocation (outside the National Park)

- Baiting and Poisioning 

- Fencing 

- Ground shooting 

- Aerial shooting 


  • Bio-Brumby almost 4 years ago
    Hi Admin, Why is this topic open to 12 Dec? I thought this forum was closing end of Nov (2014). Is this the only one going this long, or is this chat room going into Dec? Regards, Bio-Brumby
    Hide Replies (2)
    • HVBA Vice President almost 4 years ago
      The consultation period has been extended till the 12th December.
      Hide reply (1)
      • Bio-Brumby almost 4 years ago
        Hi HVBA Vice President, Thanks for the update, cheers, bio-Brumby
  • Themba almost 4 years ago
    I have to ask why you need information such as a persons Postcode and Age and Email address for this survey? Why would you require this information for a simple survey? I'm pretty sure all, if not most, of these subjects have already been covered in the forums?
    Hide Replies (2)
    • peter_mcc almost 4 years ago
      I'm guessing they want to be able to break out the answers based on where people live and how old they are. It didn't ask me for an email address probably because I was logged in. I guess they don't want people filling it out multiple times to skew the results.
      Hide reply (1)
      • Themba almost 4 years ago
        Thanks Peter_mcc, that make sense.
  • HVBA Vice President almost 4 years ago
    I took this survey a couple of days ago and I found this question a little confusing. I had the following questions for Admin (and I know they're working on it so I can post the answers when I get them if that is allowed): 1. This question asked you to rank them from 1 to 7 , but it didn't tell you if most humane was 1 or 7. I chose to say 1 was the most humane, but I felt the need to contact admin immediately because I was concerned that if 7 was actually the number they wanted for the most humane, I would have said Aerial Culling, and we all know that would be completely opposite to my views. I just wanted to make sure other people are aware of this.2. It asked you to rank them in order of a) effectiveness and b) humaneness, but there was only one answer space for each, no a) or b). I think I just answered for humaneness because that is most important to me, and also because I find effectiveness difficult to answer because I'm unsure of the exact goal we are trying to achieve. If complete extinction of the Snowy Mountain Brumby is your goal, I have no doubt that your only option would be to completely ignore the welfare of the animals and use the inexcusably inhumane aerial culling to go on a rampage that included shooting every horse in (not only all of the KNP) all of the Alps, and then some. If management of a healthy, sustainable population, that is not large enough to cause the type of damage people are concerned about, and is able to exist free of fear, pain and stress (humanely), the answer is a combination of fencing, fertility control and trapping. I don't believe we need to have a silver bullet solution (so to say), I believe that the only way forward is a flexible plan that allows for the complexity of managing this species humanely.Also, Ground Shooting can be humane when used appropriately, such as when an animal has injured itself an needs to be euthanised. There are some circumstances where it could be possible to use it as a management tool, such as if some horses were stuck somewhere after a large snow dump and it was known exactly how many were there and that they couldn't escape, it might be appropriate to euthanise them all, and in this case, if there was a yearly removal target, this would contribute to that. Another example is if a sensitive area was fenced off completely, and the majority of the horse population was trapped (and relocated where possible or destroyed), and there was known to be only, say three horses left in that area, it might be more appropriate (and effective) to ground shoot these three instead. Brumbies are creatures of habit so once you have located one, it is often easy to identify that same horse again in basically the same location. But this should not be the main management option, in my opinion, passive trapping should always form the largest part of the program.
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    • nicole almost 4 years ago
      Hi HVBA VPThanks for adding your question to this forum. You have raised some important points, so it's useful to have them addressed here. To date we have had over 8,000 visitors to this consultation site with 300 of those taking part in the conversations. The survey presents another opportunity for people to share their views and for NPWS to gather further insights from the breadth of view about the wild horse management plan. The survey was designed by a professional research organisation and provides several formats to allow for a full range of answers, together with a number of open (essay form) opportunities. We have taken your feedback on board regarding the survey and split question 22 to allow ranking of 'effective and humane treatment' separately.
      Hide reply (1)
      • HVBA Vice President almost 4 years ago
        Thanks for the response admin