How have you been involved in the Wild Horse Management Plan Review?

by Catherine Russell, about 3 years ago
Thank you for your contribution to this discussion. This discussion is now closed but you can still view the material and the discussion.

There are lots of ways to get involved and contribute to the review and redrafting of the Wild Horse Management Plan. 

Now you can download or complete online the Kitchen Table Discussion Guide – its a way to have a guided conversation about the Wild Horse Management Plan at home, in your office, in your community group or classroom and then provide this feedback to the review process. 

There is also the online survey, an opportunity to share your stories and pictures as well as the ongoing conversation via the online forums here.

All this input will be collated and help inform the review and redraft of the Wild Horse Management Plan which will then be placed on public exhibition for further consultation mid next year (2015).

Themba about 3 years ago
I never got a response to the following because that forum was closed. Is it possible to have a response now?Admin, can I ask if the indigenous peoples of the Park have been consulted on the management plan? And, if so, what are their views on the subject if you are able to provide it? I would be interested to know how they feel about the subject given that they have centuries of heritage and history interlinked with the park.
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HVBA Vice President about 3 years ago
there must be a troll on here... this is a very important question, and besides how could anyone possibly disagree that the indigenous people of the area have centuries of history there...I wish we could see who was agreeing and disagreeing with each post.
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Donna about 3 years ago
Yes, it's a serious concern in terms of fairness....I've noticed on several of the discussions that the 'disagrees' equal the 'agrees'; I'm sure I'm not the only one who thinks that's a bit odd. Someone even disagreed when I responded to Themba to say I was glad she didn't think I was being rude. How could anyone disagree with that???
nicole about 3 years ago
Hi Themba (and others), our apologies for the delay in addressing this very important question. We will respond within 24 hours. Thank you for your patience.
nicole about 3 years ago
Hi ThembaNPWS advise that they regard the Indigenous community to be an important and significant stakeholder on all park management issues. Consultation on the issue of wild horse management along with the many other issues of park management within KNP is undertaken via the Southern Ranges Region Aboriginal Heritage Working Group. The membership of working group and their elders representing some of the many Aboriginal communities who have associations with the mountains. Since its formation in 2002, the working group has played an important informal advisory role, assisting the NPWS with Aboriginal heritage study of the park, reviewing draft material for the Kosciuszko Plan of Management and facilitating communication between NPWS and Aboriginal communities. The Aboriginal Working Group and Aboriginal elders have been meeting with NPWS staff on a regular basis to discuss issues such as cooperative park management, heritage protection and interpretative, employment and training opportunities. Refer here for further information:http://www.environment.nsw.gov.au/parkmanagement/TheAboriginalWorkingGroup.htm In regard to wild horse management, the Aboriginal community is like any other sector of the broader community and there is a wide range of very strong but different views and opinions within the community as to the impact of wild horses on the environment, whether or not horses should be managed and how they should be managed.
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Mountain Man about 3 years ago
It sounds to me like the Aboriginal communities do not have any problems with the brumbies in the mountains otherwise NPWS would be blowing that trumpet hard but they cannot! In fact there are many Indigenous communities around Australia who feel the brumbies are sacred much like the local snowy mountain community. The Bundian Way - an Aboriginal path from the coast to the mountains is now being restored using some brumby tracks, luckily the brumbies are keeping some of the thick bush open to keep it accessible.
HVBA Vice President about 3 years ago
This is sort of a hard question to answer, but I will try to kick things off in here because I know it has been sitting empty for a few days.Over the course of this consultation period I have been more involved than I ever thought I would be. Originally my goal was to get on here and say a few things about how amazing Brumbies are, dispel a few myths about them, call for more research and promote the work that the HVBA does. What I have actually done is become so invested in this process that my husband has needed to repeatedly remind me that I am putting in more time per week with this than I would a full time job. I have learnt through this process just how much the Kozi Brumbies mean to me. How desperately I want to be able to find a solution that allows them to remain in the park while at the same time protect the natural beauty and ecological health of this wonderful region. I do not for one second believe that we are not smart enough to achieve this. I have been involved in face-to-face and teleconference stakeholder meetings, I have spoken to other Brumby Advocacy Groups on the phone, through email and facebook, I have joined countless new Facebook Pages to contribute this way, I have done my own research, reading through scientific paper after not so scientific article after scientific paper and using the numbers given to recalculate the statistics to make sure they are correct, I have recorded videos and written position statements to be included in the town hall meeting and kitchen table discussion booklets, I have completed the survey, I have emailed and phoned the relevant consulting companies if I was concerned I was somehow missing some information, I have called for more people to join this discussion on my own personal facebook page, the HVBA page and website and when speaking to people I know (and even some I don't), and finally I have sat up night after night, sometimes till after midnight in order to contribute to every single discussion topic on this Protect the Snowies forum. Throughout my extensive involvement in this process I have become more and more optimistic that we can find the correct, humane solution that will Protect not only the Snowies, but the incredible Snowy Mountain Brumbies as well. There have been some amazing ideas put forward on this forum, and the stories that people tell of just how much the Brumbies mean to them gives me hope that I am not the only one who so desperately wants them to be appropriately managed. All sides have come such a long way through this process, sometimes arguing vehemently other times agreeing immediately, but I feel that as we have gone on, we have started to understand each other more and now we more often discuss rather than argue. This can only be a massive step in the direction of a positive solution. I think we have all realised that you cannot please everyone all the time, so we just have to find that balance.Today, I went for my first ride in two years on friend's "trustworthy" thoroughbred. My friends each rode a Kozi Brumby that had spent the last 3 weeks being broken in. This was their first trail ride. One of the Brumbies I met 4 months after he had been captured from the park, the other I have known from the day he stepped onto the trailer to leave the park for the HVBA. This was such a surreal experience for me, to see these two horses, that were destined for the abattoir being ridden across the hills of my friends farm. They did not put one foot out of place for the whole two hours. They were the calm and responsive, happy to ride at the front or the back, willing to do whatever their rider asked of them. All I could think was "what a waste to kill a horse like this", "How could anyone send a horse this good to the knackery, or even worse, shoot it from a helicopter without ever even giving it a chance" and "We MUST find a solution to this incredibly difficult management problem because it is just lazy and wasteful to kill an animal that is as amazing as the Kozi Brumbies". What happened with that trustworthy thoroughbred you might ask, the horse that is ridden almost every day, that has kids and beginners on him constantly and has been broken in for years...well he refused to walk past a fallen log until the green broken Brumbies had both proven it wouldn't kill him. Next time, I'll take a Brumby!
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Donna about 3 years ago
It saddens me someone actually disagreed with this. :(
HVBA Vice President about 3 years ago
Here is the link to the HVBA position statement in case anyone was interested.http://hvba.com.au/uploads/Position_Statement_on_the_Management_of_Wild_Horses_in_the_Kosciusko_National_Park.pdf