Where have you seen wild horses?

over 3 years ago
Thank you for your contribution to this discussion. You can still view the material and the discussion. While this discussion is closed, new discussions will continue to open till 30 November 2014.

Join the conversation

THIS DISCUSSION MAY OPEN AGAIN BEFORE 30 NOVEMBER. 

Chris Hayward is an adventurer who this year undertook an expedition from Sea to Source to Summit - starting at the mouth of the Murray River and paddling upstream to Hume (Weir), where he left his kayak and then continued on foot through to the Corryong and Khancoban following the upper Murray and Indi Rivers to its Source at Cowombat Flat, then followed the  Australian Alps Walking Track  to the summit of Mt Kosciuszko.

He talks here about seeing wild horses and their impacts on the National Park. 




Heritage over 3 years ago
Chris Hayward states that he has read the logbook at the Tin Mine Huts in the Pilot Wilderness. He also notes that it mentions how the stream has changed so much since the horses have arrived.??.. that is very interesting given the horses arrived in the mid 19th century and have lived there ever since. The NPA has also stated that the same stream has filled with sediment because of the brumbies which is laughable. Have they forgotten about the biggest and most intense bushfire in possibly Australia's history went through the park in 2003. A few weeks after the last fire was out there was a rain event which made some streams, creeks and rivers look like lava flows! This would make good sediment!When will NPWS also make mention of the massive regrowth and density of the bush since the 2003 fires. In some areas there are literally windrows of fallen timber for kilometres. Add to that the dense regrowth of now 11 years old woody shrubs and plants along with the dead and fallen timber from the fires that has made the bush impenetrable in much of the wilderness areas. The brumbies have been pushed out of the bush and onto the open flats and stream areas because they cannot inhabit the bush because it is too thick. NPWS count the horses on the open flats and presume that the numbers are also still in the bush, but they are not. The brumbies have live in the mountains for nearly 180 years, and include cattle for over 100 years also. How many native species (plant or animal) have become extinct in this time because of them? NONE! No brumby advocates deny that they need management, but NPWS need educating on how to do this. Along with mother nature with her extreme elements in the mountains, the local people had been managing the brumbies for generations and were good at it, but they have been prohibited by NPWS. It makes sense to allow them to do it again.
Hide Replies (6)
Catherine Russell over 3 years ago
Thank you Heritage. Where in the National Park do you most often see wild horses?
Hide Replies (2)
conservationist over 3 years ago
theres hundreds of horses around kiandra the caves top end of eucanbean and particualry around tantangra dam when fishing in these areas typicaly i will se 60 - 100 around tantangra virtualy every trip in there ! just look around the main roads for huge stalion markers .. huge piles of it everywhere .. like it or not there toppling the balance of ecoligy and have to be thinned out to remain the status quo of balance of plant species nobody wants to wipe them all out but for hevens sake do something about it before your hillsides are stripped bare let go of heritage sentiment and act on sense once its gone its gone FOREVER . if it were any other feral creature you would have poisoned it into submission years ago unpopular but true nobody likes the idea of killing them but nobody is going to thank you when there national park has been totaly degridated by horses either political hot potato yes so best get some professional shooters in id say
Hide reply (1)
nicole over 3 years ago
Thanks for letting us know about the horses in those areas. Evidence such as yours is an important part of this process.
walkin free over 3 years ago
Who's heritage are you talking about. White man has only been here for a blip in Australia's history, just because some people arrived by boat doesn't mean our heritage started then. There were no horses before then and there should be no horses now. I was raised on a farm and still live on the land. I love horses but they don't have a place in the Australian Bush. To leave them there is vandalism.
Hide Replies (2)
nicole over 3 years ago
Hi Walkin Free, thanks for taking part in this discussion, and particularly for letting us know about your experiences with brumbies on Long Plains. That kind of information is extremely useful.
conservationist over 3 years ago
by heritage i ment war time horses returning from overseas etc not based on any race .. .. perhaps i have been picked up wrongly here . how about we allow more people acess to round up and remove them . but the problem is they only want strong healthy ones ? what happens to everything else ? got to remove the majority of the stock of horses ... but to leave any would just create a problem again further on down the track so a holistic aproach of removal by whatever means would have to be put in place ,, to mantain a low stocking density never allowed to build up to such numbers .. perhaps anyone could be allowed to remove them for a period of time before you cull them out win win id say this would allow for the use of the animals in the interim period .. any thoughts ???
Drifter over 3 years ago
I have no bias as to the discussion of the future of horses in KNP I know they have been there a long time, I am however a keen skier and have passed the same group of horses between Thredbo and dead horse gap on several cross country trips as have many other people, We have seen this group of 4 horses and a foal unsucessfully attempt to dig out some food from the snow pack that is at least 1.5 mts deep they appear to want to stay in this one spot for some reason, despite our attempts to herd them to lower ground, they were in poor condition in early winter and now they are worse with no foal Im sure they will not last until spring and I do not like to see any animal suffer, any opinions?
Hide Replies (2)
Catherine Russell over 3 years ago
Thank you Drifter. We can confirm that local NPWS staff are following up on the wellbeing of wild horses at the this location. If you have any further details please don't hesitate to contact 1300 361 967.
Hide reply (1)
walkin free over 3 years ago
Bit late for the well being of at least one of these horses, have just seen a pic of a dead emaciated horse in the snow at dead horse gap from the weekend
walkin free over 3 years ago
I've seen brumbies all over the high country, both in nsw and vic. Up on long Plains I had a mob of about thirty horses gallop past me, kicking up sods of dirt/grass and visibly leaving a trail of destruction through the Bush and across a Creek. Walking up around the head of the Snowy River there's horses everywhere, dung fouling up the river so as to make water purification necessary. Not too far south west from here there were no brumbies and creeks were heavily vegetated. Impassioned but factually incorrect statements just discredit your argument Heritage, whilst I can see why some others have such a strong opposing view point, please just deal with facts. Your views are interesting about the tenure of horses in this country, do they also apply to the cane toad.
Jindygal over 3 years ago
Did Heritage look at the videos or the many photos showing horse hoof imprints in the bogs? I don't think anyone would be concerned if there were only as many horses in the Australian Alps now as there were in 1900. Trouble is where there might have been 100 once, there are now tens of thousands. BIG difference in impact. For anyone walking in the mountains, it is hard not to see the horses, even though they are reclusive, moving further into the tree shelter when they sight people. Their evidence is everywhere these days: the trampled bogs and approaches to streams; the broken banks; the piles of horse dung along all the tracks and fire-trails, and the horse-formed tracks criss-crossing the hillsides. The smell of horse dung pervades and overwhelms the smell of eucalypt.My most recent visits to the Kosciuszko National Park have been in the southern KNP and around Kiandra/Broken Dam where they are plentiful. Only occasionally if we walked though dense scrub were we not aware of horses nearby. They seemed to avoid steep inclines and denser scrub. They love the flat soft ground near water and light scrub on low hillsides.