Protecting the Snowies

Thousands of wild horses range across Kosciuszko National Park.

The NSW Government has passed legislation that recognises and protects the wild horse heritage values in Kosciuszko National Park, while enabling active management to reduce their impact on its fragile alpine environment.

A wild horse heritage plan of management will be developed to identify the wild horses' heritage values, specify how they will be managed, and identify zones where sustainable populations will be retained. The plan will also identify how populations outside these zones will be controlled. A community advisory panel and an independent technical advisory group will provide input to the plan, and community comment will be sought on the specific actions proposed in the plan.

While acknowledging that wild horses represent a link to our pioneering and pastoral heritage, there is clear evidence that the current wild horse population is damaging the park's fragile alpine and sub-alpine environment. If the population is not carefully managed we risk unacceptable impacts to the environmental values of the park.

Finding a balance between protecting the heritage values of the wild horses and the environmental values of the park is challenging but not impossible.

More updates on the legislation, community engagement and future management of the wild horse population will be provided when available.

Developing the 2016 draft wild horse management plan

This page contains materials and conversations from consultation in 2014-15 with stakeholders and community on developing a wild horse management plan for Kosciuszko National Park. This work will inform development of the new wild horse heritage management plan.

Questions and answers
Videos from 21st Century
Town Hall Meeting



Thousands of wild horses range across Kosciuszko National Park.

The NSW Government has passed legislation that recognises and protects the wild horse heritage values in Kosciuszko National Park, while enabling active management to reduce their impact on its fragile alpine environment.

A wild horse heritage plan of management will be developed to identify the wild horses' heritage values, specify how they will be managed, and identify zones where sustainable populations will be retained. The plan will also identify how populations outside these zones will be controlled. A community advisory panel and an independent technical advisory group will provide input to the plan, and community comment will be sought on the specific actions proposed in the plan.

While acknowledging that wild horses represent a link to our pioneering and pastoral heritage, there is clear evidence that the current wild horse population is damaging the park's fragile alpine and sub-alpine environment. If the population is not carefully managed we risk unacceptable impacts to the environmental values of the park.

Finding a balance between protecting the heritage values of the wild horses and the environmental values of the park is challenging but not impossible.

More updates on the legislation, community engagement and future management of the wild horse population will be provided when available.

Developing the 2016 draft wild horse management plan

This page contains materials and conversations from consultation in 2014-15 with stakeholders and community on developing a wild horse management plan for Kosciuszko National Park. This work will inform development of the new wild horse heritage management plan.

Questions and answers
Videos from 21st Century
Town Hall Meeting



Discussions: All (33) Open (1)
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    Over the course of the consultation we have heard from a wide range of people on the management of wild horses in the Snowy Mountains including rangers, ecologist, people rehoming brumbies, the RSPCA, local helicopter pilot, documentary maker, a bushwalker, mountain horsemen and women, to acknowledge a few. In this our final forum for the online consultation we ask: Who do you most identify or agree with when it comes to the protection of the park and wild horse management?Watch the full 34 videos on the Protecting the Snowies playlist.
    Over the course of the consultation we have heard from a wide range of people on the management of wild horses in the Snowy Mountains including rangers, ecologist, people rehoming brumbies, the RSPCA, local helicopter pilot, documentary maker, a bushwalker, mountain horsemen and women, to acknowledge a few. In this our final forum for the online consultation we ask: Who do you most identify or agree with when it comes to the protection of the park and wild horse management?Watch the full 34 videos on the Protecting the Snowies playlist.
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    .  The safety of NPWS staff and others involved in the activity

    .  The cost of the undertaking the control method

    .  How humane the control method is

    .  The effectiveness of the method to control population numbers


    .  The safety of NPWS staff and others involved in the activity

    .  The cost of the undertaking the control method

    .  How humane the control method is

    .  The effectiveness of the method to control population numbers


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  • Why do we need to have National Parks?

    by Catherine Russell, almost 5 years ago
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    In your own words what is the purpose of a National Park? And do we need them today? 


    In your own words what is the purpose of a National Park? And do we need them today? 


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    Over the past five months a number of additional things have been put forward for NPWS to consider as part of the review of the plan. Do you have any additional things you would like to see reflected or addressed in the new plan? 


    Over the past five months a number of additional things have been put forward for NPWS to consider as part of the review of the plan. Do you have any additional things you would like to see reflected or addressed in the new plan? 


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  • What is your preferred control method and why?

    by Catherine Russell, almost 5 years ago
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    Where do you sit on a sliding scale from 0 to 10, with 0 being (this control method) is completely UNACCEPTABLE for wild horses in KNP and 10 being (this control method) is completely ACCEPTABLE for wild horses in KNP? 

    Methods that could be considered to manage the wild horse population include: 

    • Trapping and removal then rehoming or transport to abattoir
    • Trapping and euthanasia at trap site where horses can’t be rehomed or transported
    • Aerial or ground mustering
    • Fertility control
    • Ground shooting
    • Brumby running or roping
    • Fencing
    • Aerial shooting
    • Do...

    Where do you sit on a sliding scale from 0 to 10, with 0 being (this control method) is completely UNACCEPTABLE for wild horses in KNP and 10 being (this control method) is completely ACCEPTABLE for wild horses in KNP? 

    Methods that could be considered to manage the wild horse population include: 

    • Trapping and removal then rehoming or transport to abattoir
    • Trapping and euthanasia at trap site where horses can’t be rehomed or transported
    • Aerial or ground mustering
    • Fertility control
    • Ground shooting
    • Brumby running or roping
    • Fencing
    • Aerial shooting
    • Do nothing option 


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    Wild horse management is a complex and sensitive issue. When you talk about it in your community what is the one thing you want people to understand? 


    Wild horse management is a complex and sensitive issue. When you talk about it in your community what is the one thing you want people to understand? 


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    Wild horse management in National Parks attracts a broad spectrum of views. Here are four perspectives – what resonates with you? What stands out? What challenges your views? 

    Listen to Leisa Caldwell, Madison from the Hunter Valley Brumby Association, David Chief Inspector of NSW RSPCA, Mick from NPWS, Rob from the Nature Conservation Council of NSW. 

    This series of video presentations were made at the November 21st Century Townhall, an innovative consultation approach that draws together 150 people including stakeholders and the general public to examine the Wild Horse Management Plan and to...

    Wild horse management in National Parks attracts a broad spectrum of views. Here are four perspectives – what resonates with you? What stands out? What challenges your views? 

    Listen to Leisa Caldwell, Madison from the Hunter Valley Brumby Association, David Chief Inspector of NSW RSPCA, Mick from NPWS, Rob from the Nature Conservation Council of NSW. 

    This series of video presentations were made at the November 21st Century Townhall, an innovative consultation approach that draws together 150 people including stakeholders and the general public to examine the Wild Horse Management Plan and to provide input that will help redraft the approach to wild horse management Kosciusko National Park.

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    This inforgraphic outlines how the wild horse population has grown and spread throughout Kosciusko National Park in the past ten years, seeing wild horses entering areas of the park where previously they had never inhabited.  

    Are there locations that should be kept free of wild horses, where are these places and why should we keep them free of wild horses? 

    THIS TOPIC WILL REMAIN OPEN TILL 12 DECEMBER


    This inforgraphic outlines how the wild horse population has grown and spread throughout Kosciusko National Park in the past ten years, seeing wild horses entering areas of the park where previously they had never inhabited.  

    Are there locations that should be kept free of wild horses, where are these places and why should we keep them free of wild horses? 

    THIS TOPIC WILL REMAIN OPEN TILL 12 DECEMBER


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    Should we stop all attempts to control the wild horse population? And if we do opt to do nothing, what could happen? 

    THIS TOPIC WILL REMAIN OPEN TILL 12 DECEMBER




    Should we stop all attempts to control the wild horse population? And if we do opt to do nothing, what could happen? 

    THIS TOPIC WILL REMAIN OPEN TILL 12 DECEMBER




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    A historical approach to controlling wild horses in the Snowy Mountains was roping and brumby running – where by wild horses are pursued on horseback and caught via roping. The practice is currently illegal in NSW national parks as it is was regarded to be high risk to both horses and riders and inhumane.What are your views about Is this as a legitimate control method?

    THIS TOPIC WILL REMAIN OPEN TILL 12 DECEMBER 




    A historical approach to controlling wild horses in the Snowy Mountains was roping and brumby running – where by wild horses are pursued on horseback and caught via roping. The practice is currently illegal in NSW national parks as it is was regarded to be high risk to both horses and riders and inhumane.What are your views about Is this as a legitimate control method?

    THIS TOPIC WILL REMAIN OPEN TILL 12 DECEMBER 




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