Protecting the Snowies

Thousands of wild horses range across Kosciuszko National Park.

The NSW Government has passed legislation that recognises and protects the wild horse heritage values in Kosciuszko National Park, while enabling active management to reduce their impact on its fragile alpine environment.

A wild horse heritage plan of management will be developed to identify the wild horses' heritage values, specify how they will be managed, and identify zones where sustainable populations will be retained. The plan will also identify how populations outside these zones will be controlled. A community advisory panel and an independent technical advisory group will provide input to the plan, and community comment will be sought on the specific actions proposed in the plan.

While acknowledging that wild horses represent a link to our pioneering and pastoral heritage, there is clear evidence that the current wild horse population is damaging the park's fragile alpine and sub-alpine environment. If the population is not carefully managed we risk unacceptable impacts to the environmental values of the park.

Finding a balance between protecting the heritage values of the wild horses and the environmental values of the park is challenging but not impossible.

More updates on the legislation, community engagement and future management of the wild horse population will be provided when available.

Developing the 2016 draft wild horse management plan

This page contains materials and conversations from consultation in 2014-15 with stakeholders and community on developing a wild horse management plan for Kosciuszko National Park. This work will inform development of the new wild horse heritage management plan.

Questions and answers
Videos from 21st Century
Town Hall Meeting



Thousands of wild horses range across Kosciuszko National Park.

The NSW Government has passed legislation that recognises and protects the wild horse heritage values in Kosciuszko National Park, while enabling active management to reduce their impact on its fragile alpine environment.

A wild horse heritage plan of management will be developed to identify the wild horses' heritage values, specify how they will be managed, and identify zones where sustainable populations will be retained. The plan will also identify how populations outside these zones will be controlled. A community advisory panel and an independent technical advisory group will provide input to the plan, and community comment will be sought on the specific actions proposed in the plan.

While acknowledging that wild horses represent a link to our pioneering and pastoral heritage, there is clear evidence that the current wild horse population is damaging the park's fragile alpine and sub-alpine environment. If the population is not carefully managed we risk unacceptable impacts to the environmental values of the park.

Finding a balance between protecting the heritage values of the wild horses and the environmental values of the park is challenging but not impossible.

More updates on the legislation, community engagement and future management of the wild horse population will be provided when available.

Developing the 2016 draft wild horse management plan

This page contains materials and conversations from consultation in 2014-15 with stakeholders and community on developing a wild horse management plan for Kosciuszko National Park. This work will inform development of the new wild horse heritage management plan.

Questions and answers
Videos from 21st Century
Town Hall Meeting



Stories are now closed. No new stories will be published.

Your experiences of wild horses and the snowy mountains are important to this review of the Wild Horse Management Plan

Share your pictures, videos and stories here about the wild horses, their impacts, history and management and we will publish your experiences, provided they meet the moderation guidelines

In sharing your experiences, your images and stories may be used as part of the reports and ongoing consultation activities associated with the review of the Wild Horse Management Plan. 

This initial period of consultation to gather the differing views will help, along with the advice from the Independent Technical Reference Group, to review and develop a new draft Wild Horse Management Plan which will then be placed on public exhibition for further consultation next year. 


Thank you for submitting your story, picture or video. Our team will make sure it meets the moderation guidelines before posting. 

In sharing your experiences, your images and stories may be used as part of the reports and ongoing consultation activities associated with the review of the Wild Horse Management Plan. 

On behalf of NPWS we thank you for your input and involvement. 

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  • Establishing a scientific basis for the optimal management of wild horses

    by BWG, almost 5 years ago

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    We are a recently established veterinary Brumby Working Group (BWG), formed in order to give the veterinary profession better representation in issues relating to wild horse management in Australia.  Our aim is to become a central resource of scientific information about wild horses and their management, in order to be able to provide independent, evidence-based data upon which to base decisions about the management of Australia’s unique wild horses. Stated another way, we wish the decision making process to be more scientific and based on peer-reviewed information, rather than anecdotal un-refereed reports.

    Concerns regarding negative environmental... Continue reading

  • The Moral Imperative To Evolve

    by WildHorseEcology, almost 5 years ago
    Image 13

    It’s ironic that in the land downunder, which birthed permaculture- a holistic form of land management that focuses on ecological design meant to regenerate and integrate all of life, there also exists a backlash toward the land by those who claim to protect it.  Thus is a case of environmental thinking gone wrong when wild horses are caught in the middle.  ‘Brumbies’ evolved not only to survive but also thrive in varied habitats across this island continent, yet they continue to be patently maligned by environmental groups and ill-informed, mis-informed and head-in-the-sand ecologists.  The vibrant Equus caballus, an... Continue reading

  • Horses are great animals but pests in National Parks

    by Dog Trapper, almost 5 years ago
    Horse damage

    I think that most people appreciate horses; I certainly do. 

    They are a fantastic animal that humans have long relied upon. This does not, however, take away from the fact that they can be a terrible burden for our conservation areas.  In short, populations of horses must be minimised if we want to conserve the landscape, flora and fauna nominally protected in our National Parks.  

    The image below is an example of the damage horses cause in our high country conservation areas.

    In a relatively short time horses have eroded this drainage line and removed adjacent native vegetation.  During... Continue reading

  • Brumbies

    by Bega Duncan, almost 5 years ago

    it seems people love to build up the damage horses are causing in parks damage is minimal and the long term affect does not have a large impact on the area this is proven by over 100 years of running cattle in theses area if that theory was true then there should be nothing left after thousands of cattle grazed this area the horses have a natural enemy that is drought and fires that reduce numbers and as we no drought is usually just around the corner 

  • Brumbies Have Many Positive Contributions to Make in Australia and the World and Deserve a Place under the Sun

    by whecologist, almost 5 years ago

    In September and October, 2014, I visited several brumby areas throughout Australia, including the Snowy Mountains and Kosciuszko National Park. I spent several days going into see the social groups, or mobs, and to inspect their habitat, by 4WD vehicle, by foot and also on horseback. I  visited both the northern and southern part of the park, the latter being associated with "the man from Snowy River". I am an ecologist.by profession and also one who appreciates the horse in its natural, wild state. It is thrilling to observe these animals simply being themselves, being true to their age-old nature,... Continue reading

  • Kosciusko Nova

    by Janet, almost 5 years ago
    Nova12

    I wish to introduce you to our little girl. We met Nova in May 2012 at Hoofs 2010 open day. Bill fell in love with her and even tho over the next few months she proved to be a challenge. We traveled fortnightly from Melbourne to see her until we moved to Wunghnu in August 2012. Nova arrived at our place October 2012 and quickly calling the place her own.She fitted in well with our thoroughbred and 2 miniature ponies and later joined by a miniature Donkey who has become her boyfriend. Nova says "My Dad will ride me but... Continue reading

  • my NT Drover

    by vee61, almost 5 years ago

    My beautiful Boy from the Northern Territory,  I obtained through Hoofs2010- trained by me and at shows within 6 months of coming into my care, on musters with over 100 other riders, the most calm and gentle boy.For those that think these horses are feral and pests... please think again.

  • Brumbies own my heart

    by zithenz, almost 5 years ago

    Brumbies came to my attention when looking for a new horse. I was looking to start up again, after starting my family. Growing up with dogs as a child, I knew that a lot of breeds had problems due to selective breeding, "mutts" were far more healthy and had well rounded temperaments . I was looking for that healthy "mutt" from the horse world. This is where I found the Brumby, a breed by nature. Strong feet, sure footed, level head and nice types. 

    I have since opened my home and my heart to 3 wonderful Brumbies. They have formed... Continue reading

  • My perspective

    by Heritage Horses, almost 5 years ago
    Cam00244

    Heritage horses!! Hmm Brumby, Waler, Feral waste, Inbred, Invasive, Not native, Destructive, I could go on endlessly but I want to address some points that I have learnt along the way. What do I see?? I See a connection to the very backbone of our country, I see strength and heart, I see qualities that are chosen by natural selection, I see an asset that belongs to every Australian, spiritually, physically, I see great men and stead who united fought to protect our land so we could live a life of choice and freedom, a land where we are protected... Continue reading

  • Feral Horses continue to increase in Kosciuszko National Park

    by Colong Wild, almost 5 years ago

    The 2014 Australian Alps horse aerial survey has estimated that there are about 6,000 wild horses in Kosciuszko National Park, an increase on the 2009 estimate of 4,200 horses. The combined effects of removal of 2,600 horses by trapping, wildfires and drought have not halted the increase. The next most common pest in the park was deer, with just over 1000 recorded and it too is on the increase.

    In mid-2015 the National Parks and Wildlife will release a new draft Wild Horse Management Plan for Kosciuszko National Park. The NPWS needs the support of a strong Environment... Continue reading