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Saving our Species and Threatened Species Day

Threatened Species Day is held on 7 September each year to commemorate the death of the last remaining Tasmanian tiger (also known as the thylacine) at Hobart Zoo in 1936 and to focus on how to protect our threatened species in the future. It is a day to celebrate our success stories and ongoing threatened species recovery work.

The Office of the Environment and Heritage is committed to the Saving our Species program and encourages everyone in NSW to do something to celebrate National Threatened Species Day each year. We offer the opportunity to share your stories, events and activities on our EngageHQ page, and have a variety of activities, lesson plans and resources available to download.

You can learn more about the Saving our Species program and find out what threatened species live near you by visiting the links on this page. There are activities year round where you can support the endangered plants and animals in your community, with Saving our Species, at a national park or with our partners.

Threatened Species Day is held on 7 September each year to commemorate the death of the last remaining Tasmanian tiger (also known as the thylacine) at Hobart Zoo in 1936 and to focus on how to protect our threatened species in the future. It is a day to celebrate our success stories and ongoing threatened species recovery work.

The Office of the Environment and Heritage is committed to the Saving our Species program and encourages everyone in NSW to do something to celebrate National Threatened Species Day each year. We offer the opportunity to share your stories, events and activities on our EngageHQ page, and have a variety of activities, lesson plans and resources available to download.

You can learn more about the Saving our Species program and find out what threatened species live near you by visiting the links on this page. There are activities year round where you can support the endangered plants and animals in your community, with Saving our Species, at a national park or with our partners.

  • Intrepid Landcare brings adventure to conservation

    8 months ago

    Intrepid Landcare was founded to bring a new dimension to traditional Landcare activities - especially involving young people. They hold diverse events across NSW - which combine activity, networking and fun with a genuine Landcare project. See their website for more about them and events for ones near you.

    From their website:

    Intrepid Landcare is not your usual on the ground ‘Landcare group’. We are an adventurous organisation that empowers young people to lead on stuff that matters. We provide a common space to inspire, connect and empower young people to act and lead with Landcare.

    Intrepid Landcare was founded to bring a new dimension to traditional Landcare activities - especially involving young people. They hold diverse events across NSW - which combine activity, networking and fun with a genuine Landcare project. See their website for more about them and events for ones near you.

    From their website:

    Intrepid Landcare is not your usual on the ground ‘Landcare group’. We are an adventurous organisation that empowers young people to lead on stuff that matters. We provide a common space to inspire, connect and empower young people to act and lead with Landcare.

  • Corroboree frog habitat trial is a hop in the right direction

    8 months ago

    More than 300 Southern Corroboree Frogs were released into remote enclosures in Kosciuszko National Park March 16th as part of a massive effort to save this critically endangered species.

    Gabriel Wilks from the National Parks and Wildlife Service (NPWS) said the frogs were successfully placed into specially constructed frog enclosures within the park as part of efforts to return healthy populations of this species back into the wild.

    “The newly built enclosures are in very remote locations in the national park where these frogs were once found,” Ms Wilks said.

    “The eight specially constructed enclosures are 7 metres in diameter... Continue reading

    More than 300 Southern Corroboree Frogs were released into remote enclosures in Kosciuszko National Park March 16th as part of a massive effort to save this critically endangered species.

    Gabriel Wilks from the National Parks and Wildlife Service (NPWS) said the frogs were successfully placed into specially constructed frog enclosures within the park as part of efforts to return healthy populations of this species back into the wild.

    “The newly built enclosures are in very remote locations in the national park where these frogs were once found,” Ms Wilks said.

    “The eight specially constructed enclosures are 7 metres in diameter and essentially look like a bottomless swimming pool with native vegetation, logs and small ponds placed inside.

    “Designing the enclosures to ensure the frogs and their mini-ecosystems remain healthy and survive the extreme weather conditions has been a challenge.

    “Similar enclosures have been installed throughout Kosciusko National Park as part of a long term recovery plan to save this iconic species, but we’ve never before attempted to place them in such a remote area.

    “The specialist skills and local knowledge of the NPWS Landforms and Rehabilitation Team was vital to work out how habitat and irrigation requirements could actually be achieved in the field.

    NPWS Field officer Joel Fordham is part of the crew that constructed the enclosures and described these new frog homes as ‘move-in-ready’ for the tiny black and yellow striped frog.

    “The enclosures are like frog resorts - ponds will have water in summer for breeding, the right vegetation for habitat shelter, plenty of ants for food and timber slabs for winter retreats,” Mr Fordham said.

    The construction of these enclosures was funded by the Australian Government through the Threatened Species Strategy and is part of a long term recovery plan to save this iconic species.

    The frogs that were released yesterday were bred in captivity by the Taronga Zoo and Zoo Victoria.

    Earlier trials with frog enclosures have already shown promising results with breeding observed at other locations.


  • Endangered plant growing tall on the Carrai Plateau

    8 months ago

    A survey of an endangered flowering shrub on the Carrai Plateau near Kempsey has confirmed a population of more than 800 plants and some of the tallest specimens of the species ever recorded.

    National Parks and Wildlife Services (NPWS) Ranger Patrick Lupica said the survey results are good news for the endangered Guthrie's Grevillea which is only found in two sites in NSW, at the Carrai Plateau and near Booral.

    "Guthrie's Grevillea is a shrub which has green and maroon flowers and is covered in long hairs when young.

    "We were delighted to record... Continue reading

    A survey of an endangered flowering shrub on the Carrai Plateau near Kempsey has confirmed a population of more than 800 plants and some of the tallest specimens of the species ever recorded.

    National Parks and Wildlife Services (NPWS) Ranger Patrick Lupica said the survey results are good news for the endangered Guthrie's Grevillea which is only found in two sites in NSW, at the Carrai Plateau and near Booral.

    "Guthrie's Grevillea is a shrub which has green and maroon flowers and is covered in long hairs when young.

    "We were delighted to record approximately 802 plants across four populations on the Carrai Plateau." Mr Lupica said.

    "It was also pleasing to see some of the tallest plants ever recorded for this species, at 5-6 metres high, where we would normally expect them to be about half that size.

    "The purpose of the survey was to learn the current status of this species and now that we have accurately recorded the location of the plants, we can really start to help this rare Grevillea."

    The survey was carried out under the NSW Government's Saving Our Species (SoS) threatened species conservation program.

    "The survey found the plants were in good condition and recorded the Grevillea's in Carrai National Park and in the adjacent Oxley Wild Rivers National Park.

    "It is likely there could be more plants occurring in very steep terrain nearby, which future survey work will determine," Mr Lupica said.

    "Honeyeaters such as the Eastern Spinebill are fond of the Grevillea's nectar. However this plant species is vulnerable to pests such as goats, high frequency fires, and possibly disease.

    "Part of the ongoing work is to research and determine threats for this rare species and help find new populations.

    "The NPWS is working with the Australian National Botanic Gardens which is interested in propagating these plants and collecting its seed.

    "Reassessment of fire management plans, and the monitoring and control of pests such as goats should assist Grevillea guthrieana surviving into the future," Mr Lupica said.

    27 March 2017

  • Celebrating Five Islands rehabilitation

    8 months ago

    NSW National Parks and Wildlife Service (NPWS), in partnership with NSW Environmental Trust, invited the Illawarra community to celebrate the success of the Big Island seabird habitat rehabilitation project.

    Rowena Morris, NPWS Ranger said a free event will be held on 6 April giving people the chance to hear about the project and meet the volunteer groups who are vital to its ongoing success.

    "The event will be a great way for people to find out more about the Islands that are largely inaccessible and it's fitting that we celebrate the 50th anniversary of Five Island's declaration as a... Continue reading

    NSW National Parks and Wildlife Service (NPWS), in partnership with NSW Environmental Trust, invited the Illawarra community to celebrate the success of the Big Island seabird habitat rehabilitation project.

    Rowena Morris, NPWS Ranger said a free event will be held on 6 April giving people the chance to hear about the project and meet the volunteer groups who are vital to its ongoing success.

    "The event will be a great way for people to find out more about the Islands that are largely inaccessible and it's fitting that we celebrate the 50th anniversary of Five Island's declaration as a Nature Reserve," said Dr Morris.

    "The significance of the Islands starts way before then and people can learn about the Island's dreaming story through a new book The Story of Five Islands, by the children of Coomaditchie that will be available on the night," Dr Morris said.

    The Islands have been part of an active rehabilitation project for the past 4 years and in that time NPWS has seen the return of healthy populations of Little Penguins, Shearwaters and Petrels.

    "Thanks to funding from the NSW Government's Environmental Trust and the Port Kembla Community Investment Fund we are able to continue to work with volunteers and the local Aboriginal community to restore the islands though extensive weed removal and revegetation," said Dr Morris.

    "By mid-2019 year we hope to have completely rehabilitated about 5 hectares of seabird habitat and planted more than 15,000 native seedlings.

    "At our last field trip to the Island with Berrim Nuru and Friends of Five Islands volunteers we were fortunate enough to see numerous shearwater chicks in their burrows.

    "This new life is such an encouraging sign that the Islands have also been given a new lease on life.

    "By restoring them to their natural state and under the guidance of the Illawarra Local Aboriginal Land Council, we have shaped a place the Illawarra community can be proud of," Dr Morris said.

    The free event will be held at City Beach Function Centre, Wollongong on Thursday 6 April, 5-7pm. To RSVP call 02 4224 4188 or email five.islands@environment.nsw.gov.au.For more information on the Five Islands Seminar Celebration, visit the NPWS website.

  • Video spotlights Threatened Species Day at Wandiyali

    about 1 year ago

    To mark Threatened Species Day, a group gathered near Queanbeyan to conserve box-gum grassy woodland. There were Conservation Volunteers, many from Japan; a Green Army team; and people from Indigenous, government and non-government agencies joining to hear about the efforts of Wandiyali Restoration Trust to save this particularly large and fine example of an endangered ecological community. Watch the video to see the landscape and hear the science behind the volunteer work.

    To mark Threatened Species Day, a group gathered near Queanbeyan to conserve box-gum grassy woodland. There were Conservation Volunteers, many from Japan; a Green Army team; and people from Indigenous, government and non-government agencies joining to hear about the efforts of Wandiyali Restoration Trust to save this particularly large and fine example of an endangered ecological community. Watch the video to see the landscape and hear the science behind the volunteer work.

  • Superb Parrot signs erected in Boorowa

    about 1 year ago

    The town of Boorowa has erected signs promoting the superb parrot as a Saving our Species promotion. The signs feature winning artworks from local primary schools.

    The town of Boorowa has erected signs promoting the superb parrot as a Saving our Species promotion. The signs feature winning artworks from local primary schools.

  • Wild About Whales joins the Eden Whale Festival

    about 1 year ago
    Humpback whale 135134l

    National Parks and Wildlife Service (NPWS) rangers feature in the Eden Whale Festival Parade this year Oct 28-30th. The team from Wild About Whales will be on the Eden Wharf all day Saturday the 29th with free handouts and activities for kids. You will be able to hear from our whale experts, find out the best places to see whales, and even enter a whale poetry contest. If you haven't downloaded the Wild About Whales app yet, get it here and see where whales are being spotted up and down the NSW coast. Did you know four whales are in... Continue reading

    National Parks and Wildlife Service (NPWS) rangers feature in the Eden Whale Festival Parade this year Oct 28-30th. The team from Wild About Whales will be on the Eden Wharf all day Saturday the 29th with free handouts and activities for kids. You will be able to hear from our whale experts, find out the best places to see whales, and even enter a whale poetry contest. If you haven't downloaded the Wild About Whales app yet, get it here and see where whales are being spotted up and down the NSW coast. Did you know four whales are in the Saving our Species database? Find out more online.


  • Bongongo kids help the Booroolong frog

    about 1 year ago

    Bongongo Public School students learned about the endangered Macquarie Perch and Booroolong frog and the health of their habitat in the Adjungbilly catchment. The student workshop was organised by Riverina Land services and Landcare and featured OEH scientist Dr David Hunter and Luke Pearce from the DPI Fisheries team. The researchers, local landholders and agencies have been working together to fence, revegetate and protect about 180 ha of land in the catchment. The students did practical and educational activities to protect this valuable breeding habitat.

    Bongongo Public School students learned about the endangered Macquarie Perch and Booroolong frog and the health of their habitat in the Adjungbilly catchment. The student workshop was organised by Riverina Land services and Landcare and featured OEH scientist Dr David Hunter and Luke Pearce from the DPI Fisheries team. The researchers, local landholders and agencies have been working together to fence, revegetate and protect about 180 ha of land in the catchment. The students did practical and educational activities to protect this valuable breeding habitat.

  • Keen kayakers combine fitness and tree planting

    about 1 year ago

    In an innovative project with combined community support, a group of keen kayakers spent a sunny day on the Hunter River before arriving to plant endangered river red gums in the Karoola Wetlands by Muswellbrook. This Threatened Species Day project heard from a Hunter Landcare expert and local Cressfield Horse Stud donated the plants. Photos and news story here.

    In an innovative project with combined community support, a group of keen kayakers spent a sunny day on the Hunter River before arriving to plant endangered river red gums in the Karoola Wetlands by Muswellbrook. This Threatened Species Day project heard from a Hunter Landcare expert and local Cressfield Horse Stud donated the plants. Photos and news story here.

  • 3-year Lennox Head coastal regen project comes to a close

    about 1 year ago

    The Northern Star (Lismore) reported the successful close of a three year project to restore 23 hectacres of coastline. From the article: On the Edge: The Lennox Coast Littoral Rainforest and Grassy Headland Project, aimed to improve and expand the habitat of the coastline's endangered ecological communities.

    The regenerated Lennox Head grasslands, Littoral Rainforest and coastal Fontainea will be maintained over the next year as part of the state government's Saving Our Species program.

    The On the Edge team consisted of the North Coast Local Land Services, NSW Office of Environment and Heritage, professional contractors and the Ballina Shire Council.

    ... Continue reading

    The Northern Star (Lismore) reported the successful close of a three year project to restore 23 hectacres of coastline. From the article: On the Edge: The Lennox Coast Littoral Rainforest and Grassy Headland Project, aimed to improve and expand the habitat of the coastline's endangered ecological communities.

    The regenerated Lennox Head grasslands, Littoral Rainforest and coastal Fontainea will be maintained over the next year as part of the state government's Saving Our Species program.

    The On the Edge team consisted of the North Coast Local Land Services, NSW Office of Environment and Heritage, professional contractors and the Ballina Shire Council.

    They wanted to thank members of the local community who assisted planting on World Environment Day, Threatened Species Day, and on private properties and school sites.