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Saving our Species and Threatened Species Day

Threatened Species Day is held on 7 September each year to commemorate the death of the last remaining Tasmanian tiger (also known as the thylacine) at Hobart Zoo in 1936 and to focus on how to protect our threatened species in the future. It is a day to celebrate our success stories and ongoing threatened species recovery work.

The Office of the Environment and Heritage is committed to the Saving our Species program and encourages everyone in NSW to do something to celebrate National Threatened Species Day each year. We offer the opportunity to share your stories, events and activities on our EngageHQ page, and have a variety of activities, lesson plans and resources available to download.

You can learn more about the Saving our Species program and find out what threatened species live near you by visiting the links on this page. There are activities year round where you can support the endangered plants and animals in your community, with Saving our Species, at a national park or with our partners.

Threatened Species Day is held on 7 September each year to commemorate the death of the last remaining Tasmanian tiger (also known as the thylacine) at Hobart Zoo in 1936 and to focus on how to protect our threatened species in the future. It is a day to celebrate our success stories and ongoing threatened species recovery work.

The Office of the Environment and Heritage is committed to the Saving our Species program and encourages everyone in NSW to do something to celebrate National Threatened Species Day each year. We offer the opportunity to share your stories, events and activities on our EngageHQ page, and have a variety of activities, lesson plans and resources available to download.

You can learn more about the Saving our Species program and find out what threatened species live near you by visiting the links on this page. There are activities year round where you can support the endangered plants and animals in your community, with Saving our Species, at a national park or with our partners.

  • Learn about Shorebirds in Tura Marrang

    over 1 year ago

    Bega Valley residents are invited to learn about the region’s threatened species at the Tura Marrang Library and Community Centre. Life-sized models of shorebirds will be on display, fun activities for all and an exhibition of shorebird photos taken by locals on the Far South Coast will be on show. A special ‘book nook’ will have shorebird picture books for children to enjoy including the newly published The Birds, The Sea and Me which is set on the South Coast and features hooded plovers, sooty oystercatchers and little terns.Learn more on the council site and at the Library on September...

    Bega Valley residents are invited to learn about the region’s threatened species at the Tura Marrang Library and Community Centre. Life-sized models of shorebirds will be on display, fun activities for all and an exhibition of shorebird photos taken by locals on the Far South Coast will be on show. A special ‘book nook’ will have shorebird picture books for children to enjoy including the newly published The Birds, The Sea and Me which is set on the South Coast and features hooded plovers, sooty oystercatchers and little terns.Learn more on the council site and at the Library on September 7 from 10am to 3pm.


  • Fun things to do

    over 1 year ago

    OEH, WilderQuest, museums and many environmental organisations create fantastic activities and fun projects for kids and adults to spark an interest in endangered species.

    1. WilderQuest

    WilderQuest has created for you to download both black and white coulouring in sheets and colour WilderQuest Threatened species animal card collection for display.

    Play the WilderQuest games and explore the environments to find out more about these animals and where they live.

    2. Books about the nature and threatened species

    Every year the Wilderness Society presents the Environment Award for Children’s Literature. Books of particular interest on Threatened Species Day include the 2016...

    OEH, WilderQuest, museums and many environmental organisations create fantastic activities and fun projects for kids and adults to spark an interest in endangered species.

    1. WilderQuest

    WilderQuest has created for you to download both black and white coulouring in sheets and colour WilderQuest Threatened species animal card collection for display.

    Play the WilderQuest games and explore the environments to find out more about these animals and where they live.

    2. Books about the nature and threatened species

    Every year the Wilderness Society presents the Environment Award for Children’s Literature. Books of particular interest on Threatened Species Day include the 2016 shortlisted Phasmid about the Lord Howe Island Phasmid or stick insect, 2014 fiction winner Bush Baby Rescue: Juliet, Nearly a Vet, Book 4, and 2013 winner The Last Dance.

  • Learn and share

    over 1 year ago
    Wq learning logo ranger sam

    Across Australia, educators and community groups have developed resources and activities for all ages to learn about threatened species and to plan events for schools and groups. For inspiration, have a browse of the following.

    1. WilderQuest Learning lesson activities

    Stage 1 (Kindergarten–Year 2)

    • Take your class on a Playground prowl (Activity Sequence 1) to discover some of the wildlife living near you. Tell others what you think we can do to care for our wildlife. Check out WilderQuest WildThings!
    • Check out WilderQuest WildThings and Activity Sequence 12: Improve a playground habitat with your students.

    Stage 2 (Years 3...

    Across Australia, educators and community groups have developed resources and activities for all ages to learn about threatened species and to plan events for schools and groups. For inspiration, have a browse of the following.

    1. WilderQuest Learning lesson activities

    Stage 1 (Kindergarten–Year 2)

    • Take your class on a Playground prowl (Activity Sequence 1) to discover some of the wildlife living near you. Tell others what you think we can do to care for our wildlife. Check out WilderQuest WildThings!
    • Check out WilderQuest WildThings and Activity Sequence 12: Improve a playground habitat with your students.

    Stage 2 (Years 34)

    • Challenge your students with a WildTracker experience! Explore the WilderQuest habitats (Activity Sequence 3) and then investigate your Playground habitats (Activity Sequence 4).
    • Check out the WildTracker lessons and challenge your class of WilderQuest rangers to find what national park rangers do to track and monitor wildlife (Activity Sequence 9).

    Stage 3 (Years 56)

    • Explore the WilderQuest virtual environments and play the games to investigate Aussie wildlife (Activity Sequence 1). Then do a Local wildlife survey (Activity Sequence 2).

    2. Environmental Education resources

    The NSW Department of Education has a portal for Environmental Education. You will find a variety of activities, including many developed by Sustainable Schools at OEH. By understanding biodiversity, students can learn about Australia’s threatened species and the importance of habitat from their own schoolyards to the communities they live in.

    3. Environmental Education Centres

    The Department also operates 25 Zoo and Environmental Education Centres located around NSW which provide programs and resources for individual schools across the state.

    4. The Australian Museum

    The Australian Museum has a special video conference for schools on Threatened Species Day. Students will research either the platypus or a frog species to look at issues that impact these animals and will have an opportunity to ask questions related to these issues. This is only one of the many resources available for students and teachers via the Museum’s outreach programs. ­






  • Penny the detection dog

    over 1 year ago

    Penny the detection dog has learned to find the extremely rare eastern bristlebird. Using just a feather for training, she now is able to go in the bush and find birds that have eluded trained ecologists for years. On Threatened Species Day September 7, you can see Penny and other detection dogs in action in Sydney at the Domain’s Tarpeian precinct from 11am–2pm.

    Penny the detection dog has learned to find the extremely rare eastern bristlebird. Using just a feather for training, she now is able to go in the bush and find birds that have eluded trained ecologists for years. On Threatened Species Day September 7, you can see Penny and other detection dogs in action in Sydney at the Domain’s Tarpeian precinct from 11am–2pm.

  • Saving the purple pea

    over 1 year ago

    Williamsdale farmers Brett, Michael and Aaron McDonald found the highly endangered small purple pea (Swainsona recta) on their property south of Queanbeyan and are now working with Office of Environment and Heritage botanists to help save this beautiful plant.

    Williamsdale farmers Brett, Michael and Aaron McDonald found the highly endangered small purple pea (Swainsona recta) on their property south of Queanbeyan and are now working with Office of Environment and Heritage botanists to help save this beautiful plant.

  • The World’s largest Sloane’s froglet

    over 1 year ago

    In June, about 400 students from Albury formed a living mosaic so big it had to be filmed from a helicopter. The Sloane’s froglet is a vulnerable species found in NSW along the Murray River corridor between Albury and Corowa. The NSW Office of Environment and Heritage and Albury City Council partnered to develop this Sloane’s froglet awareness raising project. Artist Vicki Luke created a giant Sloane’s froglet with the local Albury school students forming its surrounding habitat. For Threatened Species Day the schools will continue their in-depth study of the froglet and learn more ways to help them...

    In June, about 400 students from Albury formed a living mosaic so big it had to be filmed from a helicopter. The Sloane’s froglet is a vulnerable species found in NSW along the Murray River corridor between Albury and Corowa. The NSW Office of Environment and Heritage and Albury City Council partnered to develop this Sloane’s froglet awareness raising project. Artist Vicki Luke created a giant Sloane’s froglet with the local Albury school students forming its surrounding habitat. For Threatened Species Day the schools will continue their in-depth study of the froglet and learn more ways to help them survive.

  • Monitoring the shorebirds

    over 1 year ago

    Volunteer Joan Dawes goes out on the water at Botany Bay once a month with National Parks and Wildlife Service staff to monitor and count shorebirds. Her efforts are just one of the many ways volunteers contribute to our understanding threatened species in the wild. Volunteers are out in the wild, monitoring their own backyards, identifying species on their computers and joining citizen science projects in NSW and around the world.

    Volunteer Joan Dawes goes out on the water at Botany Bay once a month with National Parks and Wildlife Service staff to monitor and count shorebirds. Her efforts are just one of the many ways volunteers contribute to our understanding threatened species in the wild. Volunteers are out in the wild, monitoring their own backyards, identifying species on their computers and joining citizen science projects in NSW and around the world.

  • Hawkweed detection dogs - in action today

    over 1 year ago

    Detection dogs are being trained to find noxious weeds such as the orange hawkweed. The orange hawkweed has the potential to severely effect Australia’s agriculture industry. It is currently found only in Kosciuszko National Park, where teams of volunteers work tirelessly to eradicate the weed. Detection dogs like Sally provide the extra help to find the small plants and lead the volunteers to outbreaks. On Threatened Species Day you can see Sally and other detection dogs in action in Sydney at the Domain’s Tarpeian precinct from 11am–2pm.

    Detection dogs are being trained to find noxious weeds such as the orange hawkweed. The orange hawkweed has the potential to severely effect Australia’s agriculture industry. It is currently found only in Kosciuszko National Park, where teams of volunteers work tirelessly to eradicate the weed. Detection dogs like Sally provide the extra help to find the small plants and lead the volunteers to outbreaks. On Threatened Species Day you can see Sally and other detection dogs in action in Sydney at the Domain’s Tarpeian precinct from 11am–2pm.